Platform. The everyday portal for sharing knowledge and intelligence on sustainability across Greater Manchester.

Natural Environment and Adaptation

Natural Environment and Adaptation briefing papers used to inform discussions held at the Planning and Housing Commission and Environment Joint Commission Workshop, held in January 2012. The aim of the workshop was to explore shared interests for both Commissions and examine other, emerging issues within the Natural Environment White Paper to gain an understanding of how these issues fit with GMs strategic priorities, identifying next steps.

It's all about waste!

Offering the most potential for efficient and effective working on detailed waste planning matters, the Greater Manchester Joint Waste Development Plan  (JWDPD) was adopted by each of the ten AGMA Authorities in 2011.  The JWDPD sets out a spatial framework for waste developments within Greater Manchester up to 2027, helping to direct the provision of adequate waste management facilities to appropriate locations across the city region.  The JWDPD now forms part of the statutory Development Plan for each authority and will be used alongside district-specific planning documents for the purpos

Rochdale Pioneer Museum

From Rochdale to Rio in the steps of Robert Owen

From the archives: Written to mark ten years since the first Earth Summit in Rio, this 2002 article from the magazine Industrial Evolution looks at the inspiration the Rochdale Pioneers gave to modern-day advocates of sustainability.

The new white shirts: corporate social responsibility

From the archives: In New White Shirts (first published in IE in 2002), Michael Taylor looks at the businesses that are fundamentally changing the way in which they work, incorporating corporate social responsibility into the heart of their operations. Additional interviews by Steve Connor.

Julia Stansfield and Carine Van Schie of the Manchester Triathlon Club take to the waters of Salford Quays. Photo by Len Grant

Future flows and the clean up of our waterways

From a coast synonymous with trade, to a dense and sometime factory-lined network of canals and rivers, the waterways of England's Northwest tell the story of a troubled, industrial past. Fast-forward to the 21st century, and they are rapidly becoming a central part of the social, environmental and economic renewal of the region.

Detail of Heysham power station by Jan Chlebik

Carbon counting and mercury rising

From an original article in IE magazine in 2002 Ian Herbert looked at the implications of climate change for the Northwest and at efforts to develop the region's renewable energy capacity.

Evolutionary justice across England's Northwest

From the archives: When the land is neglected, communities fragment and when our natural capital is plundered, regional partnerships stand ready to step in and help communities to helpthemselves, through environmental improvement. Originally published in Industrial Evolution in 2002.

 

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